Groundbreaking commemorates next move to keep spring waters free of pollution

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Some Orange County homeowners now have a new bill that’s several thousand dollars, and they’re OK with it. It’s all to help the local environment.Few things can beat Wekiwa Springs on a hot, muggy day.A ceremonial groundbreaking was held to commemorate the next move to keep those spring waters clear, and as pollution-free as possible.”Septic tanks have been identified as a source of 29% of the nitrogen in the river and springs. Removing these septic tanks is crucial to stopping this damage from continuing,” Orange County Mayor Jerry Demings said. It’s going to take 15 years to get 2,000 homes off of septic tanks and connected to sewer. The folks in neighborhood number one, Sweetwater West, said they are ready.”Ever since we started hearing that our septic system was leaching into it, obviously I think it was creating a lot of concern for a lot of people,” resident Ralo Flores said. It’s been a dream of Leidy Bidwell for more than 20 years.”It’s finally come to fruition and that makes me very happy,” Bidwell saidExperts say other spring protection projects have already improved the health of the springs, so now it’s high time to tackle septic tanks. Close to 80% of the homeowners agreed to pay $6,000 each to convert.”We wanted to save our beloved spring, our water supply, and of course a little self preservation, our property values,” Christine Moore said.So, the good times can continue.Phase one has a price tag of just under $9 million.Funding was secured from the state budget, the Department of Environmental Protection, St. Johns water managers, and Orange County Utilities.

Some Orange County homeowners now have a new bill that’s several thousand dollars, and they’re OK with it.

It’s all to help the local environment.

Few things can beat Wekiwa Springs on a hot, muggy day.

A ceremonial groundbreaking was held to commemorate the next move to keep those spring waters clear, and as pollution-free as possible.

“Septic tanks have been identified as a source of 29% of the nitrogen in the river and springs. Removing these septic tanks is crucial to stopping this damage from continuing,” Orange County Mayor Jerry Demings said.

It’s going to take 15 years to get 2,000 homes off of septic tanks and connected to sewer. The folks in neighborhood number one, Sweetwater West, said they are ready.

“Ever since we started hearing that our septic system was leaching into it, obviously I think it was creating a lot of concern for a lot of people,” resident Ralo Flores said.

It’s been a dream of Leidy Bidwell for more than 20 years.

“It’s finally come to fruition and that makes me very happy,” Bidwell said

Experts say other spring protection projects have already improved the health of the springs, so now it’s high time to tackle septic tanks.

Close to 80% of the homeowners agreed to pay $6,000 each to convert.

“We wanted to save our beloved spring, our water supply, and of course a little self preservation, our property values,” Christine Moore said.

So, the good times can continue.

Phase one has a price tag of just under $9 million.

Funding was secured from the state budget, the Department of Environmental Protection, St. Johns water managers, and Orange County Utilities.



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